Monday, January 26, 2009

Monday

When I was a little kid and sat around thinking about how cool it would be when I was a grown up, it never crossed my mind that I might end up spending a day trying to figure out how to get my dog's blood to Kansas.

This has been one of the stranger days in my adulthood.

Last year, after Nonnie had her annual visit to the vet -- complete with immunizations -- things went south quickly and stayed pretty awful until they finally became much, much worse. After a couple of months of sick dog, she was finally fixed by pretty drastic surgery.

Now, there might very well have been two, separate, things going on there. First, the immunization-induced canine autoimmune hemolytic anemia. And then there was the intestinal inteceception. They might be connected and they might not. But we're pretty sure the shots made her immune system freak out, and we'd like to avoid doing that again. And we really don't want her insides to get all knotted up again. So, the vet came up with a plan.

The county requires pets to be registered, and you can't register without proving an immunity to rabies. Now, the easiest, cheapest way of doing that is with a certificate of immunization -- give the dog the shot, and you can be sure she's immune. But you can also test the dog's blood for antibodies, and if the immunity is there, then there's no need for the shot. Most people don't bother with the test because it's (much) easier and (far) cheaper to just give the pets the shot.

But my dog is a special case. So this morning we went to the vet's for a blood draw. Then we came back home and I did a bit of research about how to get a spun serum to the rabies lab in Kansas while keeping it cold (this is not a routine activity at the vet's office, so he gave me the job of figuring this part out). After lunch (the La Paz de Dios luncheon!), I headed back over the vet's to pick up the prepared blood sample. Then I swung back home to pack the sample with one of those freezer blocks that'll keep your cooler cool in the summer, and rolled it up in bubble wrap -- hopefully that'll keep it cold until tomorrow morning. Then I took the forms, payment and my parcel to the UPS store to have it wrapped and shipped off. It's all supposed to arrive at the lab in Kansas by 10:30 tomorrow morning.

So, how was your day?

UPDATE: as of 2:30 on Tuesday afternoon, our little vial of dog blood is still out there somewhere. According to the tracking data, today's blizzard in the midwest has it sitting in Kansas City, MO...

UPDATE: delivery was made at 10:05 on Wednesday morning. We'll see if the sample was still any good -- hopefully it was sitting on a truck out in the cold somewhere...

5 comments:

A Free Man said...

Try moving a dog twice to two different continents. Never again.

alice said...

I was thinking of you. The form mentioned moving to England or Hawaii, so I figured I was going at least part way through the relocation process. I'm quite sure Timmons has completely paid his dues at this point.

Keera said...

Fascinating. No, not my day but your story. No, really. I love reading about the how's and why's of stuff. I hope the blood test has arrived in good shape (it's Tuesday eve my time) and that Nonnie won't need more shots.

julie l said...

I can't believe that your vet made you do that. It's a common thing around here - I've had Ms. B's blood titered before, and we got to avoid a couple rounds of immunizations.



Thank heavens that TX has finally come up from the Dark Ages - our rabies shots are good for 3 years now. Actually, they were always *good* for three years, but the Legislature mandated a shot every year. Now it's every three.



I hope that the blood was in good enough shape when they got it there. and my jaw is still on the ground re: your vet making you do it. Perhaps there is a more upscale vet in your neighborhood? You might look into vets that do chiropractic, homeopathy, or acupuncture. Vets who have invested in their skills to that extent know how to go out of their way for their clients' well being.



Just sayin'...

alice said...

Oh, he's definitely the most wonderful of vets. I'm not sure why the titer thing is so rare around here. We also have the stupid law about giving annual shots when the immunizations will last 3 years, and I suspect that's why Nonnie's immune system freaked out last year -- she's been getting too much for too long...